Whitehorse City Council

Parks

ParksAndRecreationBirdOnWater

Report a park maintenance issue

The City of Whitehorse has more than 350 fantastic parks catering for nature lovers, walkers, cyclists, children and adults.

Council’s qualified horticultural staff ensure that the quality and range of horticultural features are maintained appropriately, are inviting and meet the expectations of the community.

Park maintenance and service levels vary depending on the size, complexity and level of usage of the park. Natural seasonal variation also plays a role.

Park maintenance activities generally include:

  • Mowing, edging, weeding and fertilising turf areas
  • Planting and maintenance of gardens
  • Maintenance of site furniture including picnic facilities, seating, bollards, fencing and drink fountains
  • Maintenance of  irrigation

To find out more, search the Parks, Recreation and Leisure information at Whitehorse Maps.

Bushland Reserves

Council manages a number of Bushland Reserves throughout the municipality. Many of these areas contain natural remnants of the original vegetation that existed before development occurred. Bushland Reserves provide a home for local native wildlife and help preserve wildflowers and other indigenous vegetation.  The Whitehorse Urban Biodiversity Strategy for Council Managed Open Space, Streetscapes and Community Facilities has been prepared to guide biodiversity conservation and management actions undertaken by Council.

Fire Management Strategy

Council has adopted and implemented a Fire Management Strategy for our Bushland Reserves. Council undertakes a range of fire management works including maintenance of strategic fuel breaks, undertaking ongoing fire patrols and providing education and information on fire danger to neighbouring properties.  These activities have improved bushfire safety for residents and their properties, while also taking into account the values of the reserves for recreation, education, and fauna and flora conservation.

Report a bushland issue

Some of the municipality's most popular parks are listed below. 

Abbey Walk, Vermont

Melway ref: 63 D3/D4

There is plenty of open space to enjoy and many specimen tree plantings throughout the open grassed areas. Time with a book or picnicing with family or friends are all activities to be enjoyed here. Children can enjoy watching the ducks swimming in the creek below the suspension bridge.

For more information, visit Campbell's Croft Abbey Walk.


Antonio Park, Mitcham


Melway ref: 49 C8 C9

Antonio Park is 7 hectares in size and includes a playground, walking trails, remnant bushland, a barbeque area and bird watching opportunities.


Bellbird Dell, Vermont


Melway ref: 62 J6/K3

Named after the distinctive sound of the bellbird, this 17.5 hectare reserve extends 1.4km in Vermont and consists of open space, shared trails, feature ponds, picnic facilities and playgrounds, all within a natural bushland setting.

For more information, visit Bellbird Dell Reserve.

Blackburn Creeklands, Blackburn


Melway ref: 47 H11

The Blackburn Creeklands park consists of three continuous bushland reserves embracing Gardiners Creek: Blacks Walk, Kalang Park and Furness Park – featuring wetlands, two creeks, two playgrounds, walking tracks and more than 90 species of bird life.

For more information, please visit The Blackburn Creeklands.

Blackburn Lake Sanctuary, Blackburn


Melway ref: 48 B11/C12

At 26 hectares, Blackburn Lake Sanctuary is one of the largest municipal reserves within the City of Whitehorse. It is an important area as habitat for indigenous plants and animals and is a great place to enjoy for local residents and visitors to Whitehorse. The sanctuary has wetlands, a visitors centre (open Sunday afternoons 2pm to 4pm, except total fire ban days), two playgrounds, extensive walking trails and facilities such as picnic tables. You are also able to take part in the Blackburn Lake Sanctuary Schools Educations Program.

For more information, visit the Blackburn Lake Sanctuary website.

Gardiners Creek Reserve, Burwood


Melway ref: 61 A5/C3

Gardiners Creek Reserve is a linear park stretching between Highbury Road and Station Street. Within its 2km length, visitors can enjoy barbeques, picnic facilities, a playground and extensive walking trails that meander over bridges, around billabongs and alongside the creek itself. The reserve has wetlands, good bird-watching opportunitiesdog off-lead areas as well as barbeque areas and picnic facilities.

Koonung Creek Parklands, Mont Albert


Melway ref: 47 B3/B4

Discover the array of recreational activities in Elgar Park and Koonung Creek Reserve, which together make up the Koonung Creek Parklands. Hockey, cricket, dog walking, bird-watching, playgrounds, the Box Hill Miniature Steam Railway, a wide variety of indigenous plants and a spectacular wetland make this a must visit area.

Ronald E. Gray Reserve, Nunawading


Melway ref: 48 F6 G6

This 3.6 hectare neighbourhood park is known for its glorious array of wildflowers. It features bushland surrounded by historical stands of Monterey Pine, open space parkland, a playground, a wildflower preservation area and a barbecue area with tables.

Yarran Dheran, Mitcham


Melway ref: 49 B6 D9

Yarran Dheran is a large bushland reserve situated on the banks of the Mullum Mullum Creek. At approximately 8 hectares it forms an important part of the broader Mullum Mullum Valley bushland. Along with remnant and revegetated bushland, the reserve contains a visitor centre that is open on Sundays (2pm-4pm subject to volunteer availability, except on total fire ban days), a large picnic area and numerous walking tracks. It is the perfect place to spend some time enjoying the sights and sounds of the bush.

For more information, visit Yarran Dheran Nature Reserve