Economics Factsheet

This factsheet provides information about income, work, education and industry in the City of Whitehorse.

Employment

In the 2016 Census:

  • A total of 59.6 per cent of Whitehorse residents were in the labour force.  That is, they were aged 15 years and over and were either employed or looking for work.  This is less than for Greater Melbourne at 61.9 per cent.  It is likely this is linked with the age structure of the municipality, which includes a larger population aged 60 plus.
  • A total of 92.9 per cent of the labour force were either in full or part time employment and 7.0 per cent were unemployed.
  • Relative to Greater Melbourne, Whitehorse had a greater proportion of people in part time work and a smaller proportion in full time work.
  • Between 2011 and 2016 the number of people in employment in Whitehorse increased by 4,043 persons, most of which was through part-time positions (74.6 per cent).  The number of people in unemployment increased by 1,621 across the same period.
Figure 1 Employment Status
Figure 1: Employment Status
Business in Whitehorse
Find out more about starting, growing or changing a business in the City of Whitehorse
  • The most popular industry sectors for the resident population in Whitehorse to work in were:
    • Health care and social assistance (10, 044 people or 13.4 per cent);
    • Professional, scientific and technical services (8,405 people or 11.3% per cent);
    • Education and training (7,868 people or 10.5 per cent);
    • Retail trade (7,560 people or 10.1 per cent);
  • Whitehorse had a smaller proportion of residents working in manufacturing compared to Greater Melbourne (3.5 per cent compared to 8.0 per cent).  The number of residents working in manufacturing fell by 1,348 (35.2 per cent) between 2011 and 2016.
     
Figure 2 Top 10 industries of employment
Figure 2: Top 10 industries of employment

In June 2018, the gross revenue generated by businesses and organisations in Whitehorse was calculated at $11,062 million (National Institute of Economic and Industry Research, 2018).

Occupation 

In 2016, the three most popular occupations of Whitehorse residents were:

  • Professionals (31.8 per cent);
  • Clerical and administrative worker (13.9 per cent);
  • Managers (13.9 per cent).

These three occupations accounted for nearly 60 per cent of the employed resident population.

Relative to Greater Melbourne, Whitehorse has a smaller percentage of persons employed as:

  • Machinery operators and drivers (2.8 per cent compared to 5.6 per cent);
  • Technicians and trades workers (10.2 per cent compared to 12.6 per cent);
  • Labourers (6.4 per cent compared to 8.1 per cent).

This is likely to be linked with housing (in)affordability within the municipality.

Figure 3 Employment by occupation
Figure 3: Employment by occupation

Location of Employment 

In 2016 more than a quarter of residents in Whitehorse worked within the municipality (26.2 per cent) and 70.1 per cent worked outside the municipality.  The top five municipalities residents work in outside of Whitehorse are:

  • City of Melbourne (19.3 per cent);
  • City of Boroondara (8.3 per cent);
  • City of Monash (7.1 per cent);
  • City of Knox (4.1 per cent); and
  • City of Yarra (3.7 per cent).

Unpaid Work

In 2016:

  • A total of 22.4 per cent of the Whitehorse population reported doing some form of voluntary work.  This compares with 17.6 per cent for Greater Melbourne.
  • Around one in five Whitehorse residents (19.7 per cent) aged 15 years and over did more than 14 hours of unpaid domestic work per week.
  • A total of 15,786 Whitehorse residents were providing unpaid assistance (i.e. care) to a person with a disability, long term illness or old age living in the City of Whitehorse.  That equates to 11.7 per cent of the population aged 15 plus.
  • More than one quarter of the population (27.8 per cent) provided unpaid childcare to either their own children or other people’s children.
Figure 4 Unpaid Childcare
Figure 4: Unpaid Childcare

Education 

In 2016:

  • More than a quarter of Whitehorse residents (27.8 per cent) attended an educational institution.
  • Whitehorse had a higher proportion of residents attending University (8.8 per cent) compared to Greater Melbourne (6.4 per cent).  It is likely this is linked with Deakin University being located within the municipality (Burwood).
Figure 5 Education institute attending
Figure 5: Education institute attending
  • In 2016, nearly one third (35.9 per cent) of residents had a Bachelor degree or higher.  This compares with 27.5 per cent for Greater Melbourne.

Income

Income quartiles allow for the comparison of relative income-earning capabilities over time.  Compared to Greater Melbourne, Whitehorse had a higher proportion of people in the lowest income quartile and a slightly higher portion of persons in the highest income quartile.

Between 2011 and 2016 the biggest growth occurred in the lowest income quartile, which showed an increase of 4,746 persons.  This may be linked to the municipality’s larger older populations (aged 60 plus) or the increase in student numbers across the same period.

Figure 6 Individual income quartiles
Figure 6: Individual income quartiles

In 2016:

  • Females in Whitehorse earned less than their male counterparts across all age groups except 85 years olds.
  • The median weekly income for resident males was $798, while the median weekly income for resident females was $498.
  • 35 per cent of males in Whitehorse were in the highest Victorian income quartile (earning more than $1,435 per week).
  • 19.6 per cent of females in Whitehorse were in the highest Victorian income quartile (earning more than $980 per week).
  • 32.4 per cent of females in Whitehorse were in the lowest Metropolitan Melbourne income quartile (earning less than $250 per week).
Figure 7 Median Weekly Income
Figure 7: Median Weekly Income